put

From Middle English putten, puten, poten, from Old English putian, *pūtian ("to push, put out"; attested by derivative putung (pushing, impulse, instigation, urging)) and potian (to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), both from Proto-Germanic *putōną (to stick, stab), which is of uncertain origin. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bud- (to shoot, sprout), which would make it cognate with Sanskrit बुन्द (bundá, arrow), Lithuanian budė, and budis (mushroom, fungus). Compare also related Old English pȳtan (to push, poke, thrust, put out (the eyes)). Cognate with Dutch poten (to set, plant), Danish putte (to put), Swedish putta, pötta, potta (to strike, knock, push gently, shove, put away), Norwegian putte (to set, put), Norwegian pota (to poke), Icelandic pota (to poke), Dutch peuteren (to pick, poke around, dig, fiddle with).

See also: PUT, pût, pūt, puț, пут, and путь

English

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • enPR: po͝ot, IPA(key): /pʊt/, [pʰʊʔt]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊt

Verb

put (third-person singular simple present puts, present participle putting, simple past put, past participle put or (UK dialectal) putten)

  1. To place something somewhere.
    She put her books on the table.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room [] and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
  2. To bring or set into a certain relation, state or condition.
    Put your house in order!
    He is putting all his energy into this one task.
    She tends to put herself in dangerous situations.
  3. (finance) To exercise a put option.
    He got out of his Procter and Gamble bet by putting his shares at 80.
  4. To express something in a certain manner.
    When you put it that way, I guess I can see your point.
    • 1846, Julius Hare, The Mission of the Comforter
      All this is ingeniously and ably put.
  5. (athletics) To throw a heavy iron ball, as a sport. (See shot put. Do not confuse with putt.)
  6. To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Sixth Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      His fury thus appeased, he puts to land.
  7. To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
  8. To attach or attribute; to assign.
    to put a wrong construction on an act or expression
  9. (obsolete) To lay down; to give up; to surrender.
  10. To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention.
    to put a question; to put a case
    • 1708-1710, George Berkeley, Philosophical Commentaries or Common-Place Book
      Put the perceptions and you put the mind.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 3, in Animal Farm [], London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      Now if there was one thing that the animals were completely certain of, it was that they did not want Jones back. When it was put to them in this light, they had no more to say.
  11. (obsolete) To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.
  12. (mining) To convey coal in the mine, as for example from the working to the tramway[1].
Derived terms
Terms derived from put (verb)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also

Noun

put (countable and uncountable, plural puts)

  1. (business) A right to sell something at a predetermined price.
  2. (finance) Short for put option.
    He bought a January '08 put for Procter and Gamble at 80 to hedge his bet.
    • c. 1900, Universal Cyclopaedia Entry for Stock-Exchange
      A put and a call may be combined in one instrument, the holder of which may either buy or sell as he chooses at the fixed price.
  3. The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push.
    the put of a ball
  4. (uncountable) An old card game.
    • 1851, Henry Mayhew, “Costermongers”, in London Labour and the London Poor:
      Among the in-door amusements of the costermonger is card-playing, at which many of them are adepts. The usual games are all-fours, all-fives, cribbage, and put.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Welsh pwt, itself possibly borrowed from English butt (stub, thicker end).

Pronunciation

Noun

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) A fellow, especially an eccentric or elderly one; a duffer.
    • 1733, James Bramston, "The Man of Taste":
      Queer Country-puts extol Queen Bess's reign,
      And of lost hospitality complain.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, page 244:
      The old put wanted to make a parson of me, but d—n me, thinks I to myself, I'll nick you there, old cull; the devil a smack of your nonsense shall you ever get into me.
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 11, in Vanity Fair, London: Bradbury and Evans  [], published 1848, OCLC 3174108:
      The Captain has a hearty contempt for his father, I can see, and calls him an old put, an old snob, an old chaw-bacon, and numberless other pretty names.
    • 1870, Frederic Harrison, "The Romance of the Peerage: Lothair," Fortnightly Review:
      Any number of varlet to be had for a few ducats and what droll puts the citizens seem in it all!

Etymology 3

Old French pute.

Noun

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) A prostitute.
    • 1935, Samuel Beckett, Watt:
      And Mrs. Penny-a-hoist Pim, said Mr. Gorman. That old put, said Mr. Nolan.

References

  1. ^ 1881, Rossiter W. Raymond, A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical Terms

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch put, from Middle Dutch put, from Old Dutch *putti, from Proto-West Germanic *puti, from Latin puteus.

Pronunciation

Noun

put (plural putte)

  1. well; pit

Catalan

Pronunciation

Verb

put

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of pudir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of pudir

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch put, from Old Dutch *putti, from Proto-West Germanic *puti, from Latin puteus.

Noun

put m (plural putten, diminutive putje n)

  1. pit, well
  2. drain
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: put
  • Negerhollands: pit, put
  • Sranan Tongo: peti
    • Caribbean Hindustani: peti

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

put

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of putten
  2. imperative of putten

Finnish

Interjection

put

  1. (onomatopoeia) putt, imitating the sound of a low speed internal combustion engine, usually repeated at least twice: put, put.

French

Pronunciation

Verb

put

  1. third-person singular past historic of pouvoir

Kalasha

Noun

put

  1. Alternative spelling of putr

Latvian

Verb

put

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of putēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of putēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of putēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of putēt

Romanian

Verb

put

  1. inflection of puți:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Scots put (push). Ultimately from the root of English put.

Verb

put (past phut, future putaidh, verbal noun putadh, past participle pute)

  1. push, shove
  2. jostle
  3. press
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Scots pout, from Middle English pulet (a pullet).

Noun

put m (genitive singular puta, plural putan)

  1. young grouse, pout (Lagopus lagopus)

Etymology 3

Probably of North Germanic origin, from Proto-Germanic *pūto (swollen), from Proto-Indo-European *bu- (to swell), see also Sanskrit बुद्बुद (budbuda, bubble).

Noun

put m (genitive singular puta, plural putan)

  1. (nautical) large buoy, float (generally of sheepskin, inflated)
  2. corpulent person; any bulging thing
  3. shovelful, sod, spadeful
  4. (medicine) bruised swelling

Mutation

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
put phut
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “put”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “put”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page 284

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *pǫtь, from Proto-Indo-European *pent-.

Pronunciation

Noun

pȗt m (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. road
    put za Sarajevoroad to Sarajevo
    gd(j)e vodi ovaj put?where does this road lead?
  2. way
    ovim putemthis way
    ići pravim putemto go the right way
    vodeni putwaterway
    ići svojim putemto go one's own way
    stati nekome na putto stand in somebody's way
    teret je na putucargo is on the way
    miči mi se s puta!get out of my way!
    najkraći put do bolnicethe shortest way to the hospital
    na pola puta do školehalfway to the school
  3. path
    krčiti putto clear a path
    put do usp(j)ehathe path to success
  4. trip, journey, travel
    ići na putto go on a trip
    biti na pututo be on a trip
    put oko sv(ij)etaa trip around the world
    poslovni puta business trip
  5. (figurative and idiomatic senses) method, means
    sudskim putemby legal means; through court order
    službenim/zvaničnim putemthrough official channels
Declension

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *plъtь.

Pronunciation

Noun

pȕt f (Cyrillic spelling пу̏т)

  1. complexion, skin hue, tan
    sv(ij)etla putfair complexion/tan
    tamna putdark complexion/tan
    crna putblack complexion/tan
  2. body as a totality of physical properties and sensitivities
    mlada puta young body
    gladna puta hungry body
Declension

Etymology 3

From pȗt (road, path, way).

Pronunciation

Preposition

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т) (+ genitive case)

  1. to, toward
    put Sarajevatoward Sarajevo
    put školeto school
    Vozimo se put sela.We are driving toward the village.
    Krenuo sam put grada.I went toward the city.

Etymology 4

From pȗt (road, path, way).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Adverb

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. time (with adjectives, ordinals and demonstratives indicating order in the sequence of actions or occurrences)
    prvi putthe first time, for the first time
    drugi putthe second time, for the second time; another time
    ovaj putthis time
    sljedeći/sledeći putthe next time
    posljednji/poslednji putthe last time
    po stoti putfor the hundredth time
    svaki putevery time

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English foot.

Noun

put

  1. foot

Turkish

Etymology

From Persian بت(idol), from Middle Persian bwt' (Buddha, idol), ultimately from Sanskrit बुद्ध (buddha).

Pronunciation

Noun

put (definite accusative putu, plural putlar)

  1. idol (object or thing of spiritual worship)

Declension

Inflection
Nominative put
Definite accusative putu
Singular Plural
Nominative put putlar
Definite accusative putu putları
Dative puta putlara
Locative putta putlarda
Ablative puttan putlardan
Genitive putun putların

Related terms