alert

From French alerte (alert), from the phrase à l'erte (on the watch), from Italian all'erta (to the height), from erta (lookout, tower).[1]

See also: Alert

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Adjective

alert (comparative more alert, superlative most alert)

  1. Attentive; awake; on guard.
  2. (obsolete) brisk; nimble; moving with celerity.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

alert (plural alerts)

  1. An alarm.
  2. A notification of higher importance than an advisory.
  3. (military) A state of readiness for potential combat.
    an airborne alert; ground alert
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Formed within English by conversion, from alert (adj). Compare French alerter.[2]

Verb

alert (third-person singular simple present alerts, present participle alerting, simple past and past participle alerted)

  1. To give warning to.
Translations

References

  1. ^ "alert, adj. and n.", OED Online, revised Sep. 2012 for Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed.. Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ "alert, v.", OED Online, revised Sep. 2012 for Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed.. Oxford University Press.

Anagrams


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French alerte.

Pronunciation

Adjective

alert (comparative alerter, superlative alertst)

  1. alert

Inflection

Inflection of alert
uninflected alert
inflected alerte
comparative alerter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial alert alerter het alertst
het alertste
indefinite m./f. sing. alerte alertere alertste
n. sing. alert alerter alertste
plural alerte alertere alertste
definite alerte alertere alertste
partitive alerts alerters

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: allert

Anagrams


German

Etymology

Borrowed from French alerte.

Pronunciation

Adjective

alert (strong nominative masculine singular alerter, comparative alerter, superlative am alertesten)

  1. alert

Declension

Further reading

  • alert” in Duden online
  • alert” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Polish

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

Borrowed from French alerte or English alert, from Italian all'erta.[1][2] First attested in the second half of the 20th century.[2]

Pronunciation

Noun

alert m inan

  1. alert (device used to alarm people)
    Synonym: alarm
    antyterrorystyczny alerta terrorist alert
  2. alert (sound used to alarm people)
    Synonym: alarm
  3. alert (state of being alerted)
    pomarańczowy alertorange alert
    czerwony alertred alert
    alert ekologicznyan ecological alert
    ogłaszać/ogłosić alertto declare alert
    alert obowiązujealert holds form/applies to
  4. (military) alert (state of readiness for potential combat)
  5. (technology) alert
    Synonym: powiadomienie

Declension

Derived terms

adjective

References

  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko; Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN
  2. 2.0 2.1 Andrzej Bańkowski (2000) Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego[1] (in Polish)
  • Pęzik, Piotr; Przepiórkowski, A.; Bańko, M.; Górski, R.; Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, B (2012) Wyszukiwarka PELCRA dla danych NKJP. Narodowy Korpus Języka Polskiego [National Polish Language Corpus, PELCRA search engine]‎[2], Wydawnictwo PWN

Further reading

  • alert in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • alert in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French alerte.

Adjective

alert m or n (feminine singular alertă, masculine plural alerți, feminine and neuter plural alerte)

  1. wide-awake

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

Adjective

alert (comparative alertare, superlative alertast)

  1. alert

Declension

Inflection of alert
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular alert alertare alertast
Neuter singular alert alertare alertast
Plural alerta alertare alertast
Masculine plural3 alerte alertare alertast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 alerte alertare alertaste
All alerta alertare alertaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Anagrams